Crucifixion

Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, died by crucifixion. You can read the accounts of his death in Matthew 27, Mark 15, Luke 23, and John 19.

Crucifixion was invented by the Persians in 500 B.C and perfected by the Romans. It was outlawed by Constantine, who was a Christian convert, in the 4th century. Crucifixion so so horrific that ancient Jews believe that God cursed anyone put to death by crucifixion (Deut: 21: 22-23). The Romans wouldn’t even crucify their own citizens. The worst Roman citizens were beheaded. Only foreigners convicted of high treason and the worsted of crimes. Women were rarely crucified, but if they were they would be hung facing the cross because men could not bare seeing woman in that much pain.

Crucifixion was so horrendous that a word was created to just describe it. Excruciating mean “from the cross.”

Scourging

Before a person was crucified, they were scourged. Many would died from the scourging before even making it to the cross due the fact that it was so painful. The person being scourged would have his hands chained above his head in order to expose his back, butt, and legs. The executioner would then start whipping him with a cat’o nine tail which was made of several long, leather straps with metal balls, glass and metal hooks on the end.

The idea was to whip the back, butt and legs tenderizing and destroying the flesh and muscles making it look like raw, bloody ground meat. Every now and then a strap would whip across the front of the defendant, latching onto one of the ribs and ripping it completely out of the body. Victims would shout is agony, shake violently, and bleed heavily.

Crown of thorns
A crown of thorns was shoved onto Christ’s head making his hair and beard a drenched mess. Blood and sweat most likely ran into his eyes causing them to sting every time he attempted to open them.

Mocked

Throughout the entire process our God was mocked and spat on. His beard was ripped right off of his face. This was the ultimate sign of disgrace in that day. This was all done in front of his friends and family.

Crossbar of the Cross
Roughly 100 pounds of unfinished, splintery wood was placed on Christ’s back to carry.  The beam was most likely recycled layered with blood from past crucifixions.Christ collapsed under the weight of the cross and Simon had to carry the beam the rest of the way.

the-crucifixion-1500-x-900cm-2005-1
Crucifixion
7 inch, rough, metal nails were driven into his hands or wrists and feet, witch are the most sensitive nerve centers of the body, nailing him to the cross. To die by crucifixion would mean to die by asphyxiation. So while hanging on the cross, one would eventually die by not being able to breathe. Each breath would be tremendously painful, as they would have to pull themselves up for each breath.

This was all done in public places. If crucifixion happened today it would most likely be down long the side of streets and freeways, or in front of the mall so everyone could see. The worst, low life type of people would gather around those being crucified to mock, spit at, jeer and shame the person. The cross was usually set at eye level so that people walking by would see them face to face. Eventually, one being crucified, would loss all control of bodily function. A pool of blood, urine, waste, sweat, and tears would collected at the bottom of the cross.

“Since, therefore, we have now been justified by his blood, much more shall we be saved by him from the wrath of God” – Romans 5:9

O praise the one who paid my debt and raise this life up from the dead.

Nick

2 Comments

Filed under Gospel

2 responses to “Crucifixion

  1. Julie

    WOW! That sure reminded me of scenes from “The Passion.” I didn’t really know all of that historical background on crucifixion. That’s interesting. I’m still amazed that God would willingly give Himself up for us and pay our debt of sin like that! Thanks for sharing that Nick!

  2. Nick II

    Thanks to Lord Jesus for saving me… He died on the cross for our sin… I thank you… I love you Jesus…

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