Philippians 2:1-18

I thought we’d try something a little bit different for the blog post this week and have VIers post their own questions and observations about the passage. So go ahead and leave a comment with your own questions and ideas about the passage.

This passage is loaded with Gospel, community, and mission implications. I thought it might be cool if we all contributed to the blog this week…

Nick

Advertisements

12 Comments

Filed under Philippians

12 responses to “Philippians 2:1-18

  1. John

    OK. I guess I’ll post the first one…

    How can all the different churches (or ministries in our case) be of the “same mind”, “same love”, and “full accord” with one another?

    It seems like this passage is telling us to all work together according the will of God. How can we do that we all the other college ministries?

  2. Sam

    Christ didn’t settle for less than perfection. It wasn’t enough for Him to take human form… he was obedient to the point of death as well. He did all of this so that at His name every knee shall bow and tongue confess that He is Lord.

    Take time to reflect on Paul’s demands: Do all things without grumbling or questioning. Be glad and rejoice.

    Also, take time to think about how powerful the name of Christ is. One day EVERY knee shall bow and EVERY tongue confess. That’s a lot of knees and a lot of mouths! Remember, we have that power!

    Spend time this week quietly, solemnly and humbly meditating on the power and perfection Paul describes in this passage.

  3. Matt

    There’s a ton in this passage on what we can now do as followers of Christ. This is meant to be an encouragement to us. When I’m allowing the Gospel, when Im allowing Grace to impact my life, my heart will have the desire to do these things that Paul is instructing.

    I get to and want to humble myself before others.
    I get to and want to serve others.
    I get to obey God not out of compliance, but because my heart desires to.
    I get to see that my salvation is not only about going to heaven, but that I can make it count here on earth- I get to and want to be a light to others.
    I get to and want to become more like Christ everyday.

  4. viministry

    Matt, what happens when you don’t allow the gospel to impact your life?

    -Nick

  5. scopefactor

    after reading through the passage these are the questions I came up with.

    1. How are we promoting unity in VI/our living room, and how can we do better.
    2. How are we serving others, and how can we serve them better?
    3. Are we being effective at being lights to the world? (would the people around us notice if we suddenly weren’t there?)

  6. viministry

    What areas of my life am I prideful, and as a result failing to believe the gospel of Christ? and why?

  7. Sarah

    Well im not the best with putting thoughts into words but here we go… I just love hearing about how Jesus lived a perfect life yet humbled himself to die for US. Even though he was so much “better” then us and we are the ones that deserved death He took the pain and shed his own blood for us. How can we ever put ourself before someone or think that we are better than someone else! That sounds completely ridiculous after knowing what Christ did for ALL because we all are equal. It goes on to say that after Christ’s death on the cross God exalted Him to the highest place…if we humble ourself and put others before ourself we will be used for Him and blessed by Him but we also cant do these things with the wrong heart. We must obey God and do everything with no complaining or arguing!!

  8. Amy McG

    While I was reading this passage, I was struck by how prevalent the theme of unity was throughout it. It comes up repeatedly in the first eighteen verses of chapter 2. Let’s take a look now, shall we?

    – v. 2 talks about “being likeminded.”
    – v. 2 discusses “have the SAME love” (emphasis added by yours truly.)
    – v. 2 speaks of “being of one accord.”
    – v. 2 extols us to be of “one mind.”
    – vs. 3-4 tell us to consider others before ourselves, the implication being that we are unified through this form of humilty.
    – vs. 5-11 remind us of the greatest act of humility and sacrifice ever performed: Christ’s death on the cross and that because of this “every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord” (and consequently we should be unified in our praise to our Savior).
    – vs. 14-16 command us to “do all things without complaining and disputing” (i.e., be unified in this manner) and continue to inform us of why this is vital to our Christian walk.

    The theme of unity is especially significant because there is so much dissension within the Church at times. Think about it. There are Catholics, Protestants, Lutherans, non-denominationals, etc. Christianity as a whole is thereby splintered into various cells because we are unable to agree on the appropriate interpretation of Scripture. Within denominations, each church often teaches things differently.

    And I don’t know about you guys, but I have witnessed a lot of really silly arguments take place within churches. For instance, when my own church (Rock Point Church) moved to a different building, the lead pastor informed the congregation that food and drinks would no longer be allowed in the sanctuary due to the rent agreement. To my chagrin, I actually heard people threatening to leave the church because they could no longer bring their morning coffees into church with them. Hey, I love a good frappacino too, people. But that’s just ridiculous.

    Disagreements pop up everywhere. Sometimes I feel as if we’re thinking, “Hmm, things are just too peaceful. I’d like to argue with someone about something.” Is it a sin to drink or smoke? Is it a sin if you allow your kids to dress up for Halloween? Is it a sin to use birth control?

    Now, if someone is doing something that is clearly in opposition to what God’s Word says, we need to confront them. But there are a lot of little issues that it seems like people pick on and fight about. Half the time I think we’re subconciously bickering about them so that we can avoid confronting the genuine sin that’s going on in our lives. Let’s argue about whether or not it’s a sin to watch PG-13 movies instead of facing our addictions to gossip, pornography, etc. (Note: this last line is facetious; I’m not actually suggesting we argue. You can’t see the mischievous look on my face right now, so I thought I’d better clarify.)

    You know, while I was reading this passage, I kept thinking of Romans 14:1 which reminds us “not to dispute over doubtful things.” (Actually, there are quite a few good verses in Romans pertaining to this issue, but I’m guessing there is a word limit on these posts. *Wink*!)

    The last thing I want to say is that I feel like unity is one of our strengths in this ministry. Of course, we have our slip-ups now and again(*Cough* stupid facebook threads *cough*), but I constantly see our ministry working and and growing together in unity. The love and community I see in our ministry is phenomenal and I just want to encourage all of you (and I do mean all!) because I think you are all doing a great job in this area. Thank you!

  9. johnholman

    Who is this John? Weird. I’m not used to seeing another John around here. Welcome.

    Verses 3 and 4 provide some of the simplest words the Bible has for personal application. Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit, but in humility, consider others better than yourselves. Each of you should look not only to your own interests, but also to the interests of others. Continuing on with verse 14, do everything without complaining or arguing.

    I feel like we beat these things down into the ground whenever we talk about them because everyone “knows” these things…. but we all suck at them, BAD. So, obviously, we have something left to learn. If Jesus really did take on the form of a man and become obedient to death, it’s the least we could do to truly believe his word, rather than just “knowing” it.

    When I examine this passage, I can’t think past anything besides the personal calls to me because I know that I fail so badly with them all the time. I get upset with people, I complain when I don’t get my way, I grumble when I only get 2 hours of sleep because I have work to do. Constantly, my actions are screaming out, “I am better than everyone else. I deserve better than them. I should get my way. My ideas are better.” And I know that everyone else does it, too. We act like we know how to live our lives according to the gospel, but we’re honestly very bad about it. We should be thinking this week about what verses 3, 4, and 14 actually mean for our everyday lives, because there are few places in the Bible with such clear instructions for us.

  10. Matt

    Amy… Seriously. Did you really have to write so much? Just kidding. Good points.

    Mark Driscoll actually did an awesome message at the Gospel Coalition about this very thing that was very convicting. Here are his message notes:

    http://www.theresurgence.com/gospel_coalition_2009_driscoll_outline

    For me personally, I love arguing. It has been a passion of mine in the past and sometimes can still become my passion. But, God has been maturing me in this area. He has been showing me the big picture. It’s not about us, it’s about Him. It’s about spreading the message that Jesus became our sin and was punished in our place and then conquered death. We shouldn’t quarrel and waste so much time on those open hand theological differences, especially when it can confuse and hurt so many of our brothers and sisters in Christ. We can have theological differences, but let’s not allow satan to use those (it really doesn’t matter) differences to seperate us, to not want us to fellowship and serve together.

  11. Amy McG

    Yeah, sorry about that, Matt! I think I must write even faster than I talk. If that’s possible…

  12. Steph

    I’ll start off by saying that Philippians is absolutely amazing and I am so glad that we are reading through this book in our LRs.

    I just spent the last hour looking at Philippians 2:12&13 and I’m just blown away by God’s faithfulness, love, and promises. While Sanctification is a continual process that believers are called to actively take part in, God is still the one who inclines our heart to pursue righteousness and holiness. Martin Lloyd-Jones writes, “…in the vital depths of our being, God by the Holy Spirit is doing something. And what is he doing? This is how Paul puts it: he energizes us, he works in us, ‘both to will and to do of his good pleasure’. Can anything be more radical than that? It means that every good desire, every Christian thought and aspiration which I have is something which has been produced in me by God. God controls my willing, it is God who energizes my very desires and hopes and aspirations and thoughts, he stimulates it all.” Wow… I’m just blown away by the love of God. Tying back to Philippians 1:6, it is God who gives us the gift of salvation and He will carry it out to completion. Praise God.

    Sorry if this was pretty scattered… So much good stuff… I get too excited and my thoughts don’t flow together. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s